What did the USSR think about Israel in the cold war and the USSR's economy.

Go down

What did the USSR think about Israel in the cold war and the USSR's economy.

Post by Hashem on Mon Jul 10, 2017 4:23 pm

What did the USSR think about the Palestinian and Israeli conflict as a whole? Which side were they on and did they really give any support? Also which side did the USSR think more highly of in the Yom Kippur War, and the 1967 war(All Israeli Conflicts). And what caused the USSR's economy to go down or their economy to get worse?
avatar
Hashem
Cornicen

Posts : 33
Join date : 2017-07-08

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: What did the USSR think about Israel in the cold war and the USSR's economy.

Post by Icaria909 on Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:31 pm

What did the USSR think about the Palestinian and Israeli conflict as a whole?

In regards to public policy, the USSR primarily favored the Arab nations. Its political relationships with Syria and Egypt were considered too valuable as instruments of Soviet influence to be jeopardized with support for Israel.

In regards to general opinions of Soviet people: migration and religious history tied the people together. Firstly, the Kibbutz system developed by Jewish pioneers was socialist in nature-which contributed to some warm feelings towards the Israelis. Secondly, Jews from the Russian Empire, and eventually the Soviet Union, migrated to Israel in large numbers. In fact, Russian is the third most spoken language in Israel. You can navigate the country's urban centers relatively well if you new a fair amount of Russian. Thirdly, the Russian Empire claimed special ties to the region due to the large Orthodox population and religious shrines. That special connection continued in an altered form in the Soviet period and remains important to the Russian Federation. It is one of the contributing factors to why Russia is intervening in the Syrian Civil War.

Which side were they on and did they really give any support?

The closest they came to supporting the Arabs was through the sale of Soviet weapons. Other than that, they did not actively support their struggle.

Also which side did the USSR think more highly of in the Yom Kippur War, and the 1967 war(All Israeli Conflicts)

See above answers.

And what caused the USSR's economy to go down or their economy to get worse?

I assume you are referring to the "era of stagnation" most commonly associated the premiership of Brezhnev? It depends upon who you ask, but this post will be based on a cursory reading Paul Kennedy: the economic stagnation was the result of an over-centralized command economy, collectivization, and lack of open intellectual resources.

The command economy that characterized of the Soviet Union in the Stalin era was mildly successful in rapid industrialization; however, one reason it was mildly successful was due to regressive nature of the Russian economy prior to World War I. The Russian economy had been primarily rural and agriculture-oriented and what little heavy industry it did have was primarily military related, built using foreign capital and entrepreneurs, and relied on primitive technology to run. A centralized committee could reasonably organize such a simple economy in its early stages. As the economy grew and became increasingly complex in the 60s and 70s, centralized planning became untenable, prone to waste, and unable to change itself to new economic trends.

The collectivization of the farms under Stalin was both driven by ideology and a need to destroy the Kulaks as a potential opposition group. While collectivization did achieve that end, it created a situation that where individuals in the collective lacked the tools and motivation to experiment and increase their yields.

Finally, the lack of an open intellectual atmosphere prevented average Soviet citizens from contributing to the scientific and economic development of the country. While the Soviet Union could achieve some remarkable scientific advancements, they were mostly driven by political necessity and funded and run by the government. For more information consider reading Solzhenitsyn's In the First Circle for an interesting fictional take. However, average citizens were not allowed to participate in these endeavors because of political risk. It is telling that in the 1980s, in some portions of the Soviet Union, people still had to gain permission before they could use paper copying. In contrast, the open market and political freedoms of the US allowed its citizens to freely exchange information and innovate. Without these conditions, Bill Gates would never have developed Microsoft. While that is a big example, small innovations are the key to expanding economic opportunities and the Soviet citizens largely could not take part in that process.

These combination of factors led to an economy that consistently failed to grow by the late 60s and 70s. Many of the problems were rooted in historical development, ideology, and political expediency and rapid changes to the system could jeopardize this challenging balancing act-as Gorbachev soon discovered.
avatar
Icaria909
Pedes

Posts : 3
Join date : 2017-07-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: What did the USSR think about Israel in the cold war and the USSR's economy.

Post by Hashem on Mon Jul 10, 2017 11:28 pm

Icaria909 wrote:What did the USSR think about the Palestinian and Israeli conflict as a whole?

In regards to public policy, the USSR primarily favored the Arab nations. Its political relationships with Syria and Egypt were considered too valuable as instruments of Soviet influence to be jeopardized with support for Israel.

In regards to general opinions of Soviet people: migration and religious history tied the people together. Firstly, the Kibbutz system developed by Jewish pioneers was socialist in nature-which contributed to some warm feelings towards the Israelis. Secondly, Jews from the Russian Empire, and eventually the Soviet Union, migrated to Israel in large numbers. In fact, Russian is the third most spoken language in Israel. You can navigate the country's urban centers relatively well if you new a fair amount of Russian. Thirdly, the Russian Empire claimed special ties to the region due to the large Orthodox population and religious shrines. That special connection continued in an altered form in the Soviet period and remains important to the Russian Federation. It is one of the contributing factors to why Russia is intervening in the Syrian Civil War.

Which side were they on and did they really give any support?

The closest they came to supporting the Arabs was through the sale of Soviet weapons. Other than that, they did not actively support their struggle.

Also which side did the USSR think more highly of in the Yom Kippur War, and the 1967 war(All Israeli Conflicts)

See above answers.

And what caused the USSR's economy to go down or their economy to get worse?

I assume you are referring to the "era of stagnation" most commonly associated the premiership of Brezhnev? It depends upon who you ask, but this post will be based on a cursory reading Paul Kennedy: the economic stagnation was the result of an over-centralized command economy, collectivization, and lack of open intellectual resources.

The command economy that characterized of the Soviet Union in the Stalin era was mildly successful in rapid industrialization; however, one reason it was mildly successful was due to regressive nature of the Russian economy prior to World War I. The Russian economy had been primarily rural and agriculture-oriented and what little heavy industry it did have was primarily military related, built using foreign capital and entrepreneurs, and relied on primitive technology to run. A centralized committee could reasonably organize such a simple economy in its early stages. As the economy grew and became increasingly complex in the 60s and 70s, centralized planning became untenable, prone to waste, and unable to change itself to new economic trends.

The collectivization of the farms under Stalin was both driven by ideology and a need to destroy the Kulaks as a potential opposition group. While collectivization did achieve that end, it created a situation that where individuals in the collective lacked the tools and motivation to experiment and increase their yields.

Finally, the lack of an open intellectual atmosphere prevented average Soviet citizens from contributing to the scientific and economic development of the country. While the Soviet Union could achieve some remarkable scientific advancements, they were mostly driven by political necessity and funded and run by the government. For more information consider reading Solzhenitsyn's In the First Circle for an interesting fictional take. However, average citizens were not allowed to participate in these endeavors because of political risk. It is telling that in the 1980s, in some portions of the Soviet Union, people still had to gain permission before they could use paper copying. In contrast, the open market and political freedoms of the US allowed its citizens to freely exchange information and innovate. Without these conditions, Bill Gates would never have developed Microsoft. While that is a big example, small innovations are the key to expanding economic opportunities and the Soviet citizens largely could not take part in that process.

These combination of factors led to an economy that consistently failed to grow by the late 60s and 70s. Many of the problems were rooted in historical development, ideology, and political expediency and rapid changes to the system could jeopardize this challenging balancing act-as Gorbachev soon discovered.
So the USSR's economy got too big for itself?
avatar
Hashem
Cornicen

Posts : 33
Join date : 2017-07-08

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: What did the USSR think about Israel in the cold war and the USSR's economy.

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum